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Rippleside Cemetery Barking & Dagenham
   

Rippleside Cemetery

Rippleside Cemetery, May 1999. Photo: S Williams

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Rippleside Cemetery is a large cemetery set up by Barking Parish Burial Board. It was opened in 1886, the first burial taking place in October of that year. The original C19th Lodge, gates and some original railings remain, together with the chapel, where the most impressive monuments are found. The grounds were well planted, and contain notable cedars, holly, yew, laurel and bay. The burial ground was extended to the east in c.1950. Today the cemetery has memorial and lawn-grave sections, a dedicated children's area and a memorial garden.
Previous / Other name:
Site location: Ripple Road, Barking, Essex
Postcode: IG11 9PF > Google Map
Type of site: Cemetery
Date(s): 1886, extended 1950s
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
Borough: Barking & Dagenham
Site ownership: LB Barking & Dagenham
Site management: Cemeteries Office
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: 1 Oct-31 Mar: M-F 10-4.30; S/S/BH 10-4; 1 Apr-30 Sept: M-F 10-7; S/S/BH 10-6
Special conditions:
Facilities: Toilets
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Upney (District; Hammersmith & City). Bus: 62, 287, 368.
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/04/2002
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.barking-dagenham.gov.uk

Fuller information:

This large cemetery was proposed in 1884 for the Ecclesiastical Parish of St Margaret's, Barking. The original 12-acre site was purchased by the Barking Parish Burial Board and the Vestry provided £6,000 for laying out the grounds and building a chapel. The C19th Lodge Chapel and the gates and railings were designed by local architect Charles James Dawson, who described the style he adopted as 'characteristic of the historical part of Barking' (quoted in Meller). Dawson designed other buildings in Barking and planned Barking Park (q.v.). He was buried here in 1933. The grounds were well planted, with notable cedars, holly, yew, laurel and bay. The cemetery was opened in 1886, with the first burial taking place in October of that year. It was taken over by the Urban District Council in 1897. The most impressive monuments are near the chapel, and incude a marble triptych to Margaret Gow (d.1929) and family grave of the Kelly family. Six people who died in an explosion on 12 January 1899 at Hewett's works in Barking are buried here. The site was extended at its eastern end in c.1950. Today the cemetery has memorial and lawn-grave sections, dedicated children's area and a memorial garden.

Sources consulted:

'A Century of Progress in Local Government in Barking'; Barking Urban District Council Minutes; James Howson 'A Brief History of Barking & Dagenham' (LBBD Libraries Dept, 6th ed 1990); Hugh Meller & Brian Parsons,'London Cemeteries, An Illustrated Guide and Gazetteer', 4th edition (The History Press, 2008)
Grid ref: TQ461839
Size in hectares: 5
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation: New Open Space
   

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