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Childs Hill Park Barnet

Summary

References to Child's Hill as a place name date from at least 1593, and it is likely it was called after Richard le Child, who owned land here in the C14th. At one time there was a brick and tile making industry, which supplied materials when the Hampstead area was being developed from the late C18th. Housing development at Child's Hill was rapid once the Child's Hill and Cricklewood Station opened in 1870. Childs Hill Park was created on land that was gifted to the Hendon Board for this purpose in 1891 by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The park was laid out with a paddling pool, pavilion, bowling green and tennis courts.

Basic Details

Site location:
Granville Road/Hodford Road/Nant Road, Childs Hill

Postcode:
NW2 2AT ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Public Park

Date(s):
1890s

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Barnet

Site ownership:
LB Barnet

Site management:
Leisure and Youth Services, Green Spaces Division/Friends of Basing Hill and Childs Hill Parks

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
unrestricted

Special conditions:

Facilities:
Tennis courts, large playground, bowling green

Events:

Public transport:
Tube: Golders Green (Northern) then bus. Bus 226, [102].

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/08/2000
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.barnet.gov.uk

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ247868 (524787,186194)

Size in hectares:

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
No

Tree Preservation Order:
Not known

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
Yes

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
Premier Park (with Basing Hill Park)

Childs Hill Park

Childs Hill Park, August 2000. Photo S Williams

Click photo to enlarge.

Fuller information

References to Child's Hill as a place name date from at least 1593, and it is likely it was called after Richard le Child, who owned land here in the C14th. At one time there was a brick and tile making industry, which supplied materials when the Hampstead area was being developed from the late C18th. Due to its altitude and visibility Childs Hill was the site for an optical telegraph station from 1789-1847 and in 1808 became one of the telegraph stations between the Admiralty and Great Yarmouth that served the country's national defences.The land for the recreation ground was gifted to Hendon Board by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, although The Hendon and Finchley Times of 13 March 1891 reports on complaints by members of Hendon Board about 'the expensive conditions attached to this gift of a recreation ground that involved building a sewer and a wall. The matter was eventually resolved, and the park, with its pavilion, bowling green and tennis courts, is today much used by local residents.' (Jo Goldsworthy). The OS map of 1936 shows the park laid out with paddlling pool, tennis courts and bowling green. The park opens to a grassed area surrounded by quite thick, well-planted shrubberies with seating in niches, and various trees throughout. The park is quite well maintained although it is a rather bland space, with no formal areas of planting to speak of. There are tennis courts, playground and hedged bowling green, and a one-storey pavilion much graffitied, used as a clubhouse for activities.

Sources consulted:

Jo Goldsworthy, 'Child's Hill Allotments, A history of the site's origins and formation 1889 - 1936' (February 2007 on www.childshillallotments.org.uk)

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