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SITE DETAILS

Holy Trinity Churchyard Barnet

Summary

Holy Trinity Church was designed in 1845/6 by Anthony Salvin who lived in East Finchley and was the Vicar's Warden. At that time the area was still little more than a village, but it developed rapidly after the railway was extended to Edgware and High Barnet between 1867 and 1872. In the 1860s the church was enlarged. The churchyard contains a number of mature trees and some interesting tombs.

Basic Details

Site location:
Church Lane, East Finchley

Postcode:
N2 0TH ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Churchyard

Date(s):
1845-46

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
LBII: Holy Trinity Church

Borough:
Barnet

Site ownership:
Diocese of London

Site management:
Church

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
unrestricted

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Tube: East Finchley then bus. Bus 143.

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/08/2000
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news.

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ265896 (526596,189714)

Size in hectares:

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
No

Tree Preservation Order:
Not known

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
None

Holy Trinity Churchyard

Holy Trinity Churchyard, August 2000. Photo: S Williams

Click photo to enlarge.

Fuller information

Holy Trinity Church is constructed of ragstone with freestone dressings and has a bell-cote and spirelet at the west end. In the 1860s the church was enlarged, with north and south aisles added, each having a separate pitched roof. The churchyard contains some interesting monuments, with tombstones set in the grass. A tarmac path runs through the churchyard and there are a number of mature trees including a variety of evergreen trees, conifers and a holly hedge onto Church Lane.

Sources consulted:

Bridget Cherry & Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: London 4: North (Penguin, 1998).

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