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St Paul's Churchyard, Mill Hill Barnet
   

St Paul's Churchyard, Mill Hill

St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams

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St Paul's Church was consecrated in 1833, paid for by William Wilberforce, an important figure in the Anti-Slavery Movement. Wilberforce had moved to Highwood Hill in 1825 and gained permission to build the church on a gravel pit site on Belmont Estate. St Paul's became a parish church in 1926. The churchyard has yew in front, iron railings and flower beds to the road. Behind the church is a large churchyard with numerous trees including yews and other species.
St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams
> Enlarge
St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams
> Enlarge
St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams
> Enlarge
St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams
> Enlarge
Previous / Other name:
Site location: The Ridgeway, Mill Hill
Postcode: NW7 4ED > Google Map
Type of site: Churchyard
Date(s): 1829
Designer(s): Church: Samuel Hood Page
Listed structures: LBII: St Paul's Church
Borough: Barnet
Site ownership: Diocese of London
Site management: Church (Churchyard Working Group)
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Mill Hill East then bus. Rail: Mill Hill Broadway then bus. Bus: 240.
St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams
> Enlarge
St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams
> Enlarge
St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams
> Enlarge
St Paul's Churchyard, September 2000. Photo: S Williams
> Enlarge
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/09/2000
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.stpaulschurchmillhill.co.uk

Fuller information:

The Ridgeway was an ancient route that ran along Mill Hill, an area unsuited to crops due to the heavy clay soil, and with no navigable river it was not much settled and was a largely forested area. There is mention of a mill in 1321 but this ceased to function by the end of the century and settlements at the top of Milespit Hill are known from 1353 and around a mill near the junction of Hammers Lane. There are various reasons for late development of the suburban growth here such as the large number of institutions in their own grounds in the area, which include Mill Hill School, Belmont School, and St Joseph's College (q.q.v.), and also the railways avoided the high ground.

St Paul's Church was designed in 1829 by Samuel Hood Page and consecrated in 1833, paid for by William Wilberforce, an important figure in the Anti-Slavery Movement, who lived at Hendon Park from 1826-1831; a blue plaque recalls this. Wilberforce, who had a long dispute with the Rector Theodore Williams (1812-1875), had moved to Highwood Hill in 1825 and gained permission to build the church on a gravel pit site on Belmont Estate. Brick was made locally at a kiln on Hendon Wood Lane, the church is rendered in cement. Until then the residents of Mill Hill had to go to the parish church of St Mary's at Hendon (q.v.). It became a parish church in 1926. The churchyard has yew in front, and iron railings and flower beds to the road.

Sources consulted:

Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner,'The Buildings of England: London 4: North (1998) p. 183/4; Arthur Mee 'The King's England: London North of the Thames except the City and Westminster' (Hodder & Stoughton Ltd, 1972).
Grid ref: TQ225927
Size in hectares:
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Mill Hill
Tree Preservation Order: Not known
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: Yes
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: Yes - Area of Special Archaeological Significance
Other LA designation: Article 4 Direction
   

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