London Gardens Online
Record
London Gardens Online

SITE DETAILS

Brent River Park, formerly Tokyngton Recreation Ground and St Raphael's Open Space Brent

Summary

Brent River Park was created as part of the River Brent Restoration Project, and links two existing public open spaces on either side of the river Brent in Tokyngton,.Together with the acquisition of further land holdings to the north this now provides a linear park of c.2km. The area on the west of the river is Tokynton Recreation Ground, with St Raphael's Open Space on the east, both dating from the 1980s. Originally part of the land here was a sewage farm. The Brent River Park Project is part of a wider flood alleviation scheme; a partnership between LB Brent and the Environment Agency, the project aims to enhance employment, provide opportunities for recreation and improve safety and accessibility to the locality.

Basic Details

Previous / Other name:
Monks Park

Site location:
Monks Park Gardens, Tokyngton

Postcode:
HA9 ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Public Park

Date(s):
1980s

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Brent

Site ownership:
LB Brent

Site management:
Parks Service

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
unrestricted

Special conditions:

Facilities:
Children's playground, wildlife area, sports pitch, skate park

Events:

Public transport:
London Overground/Tube (Bakerloo): Stonebridge Park. Bus: 18, 112.

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/03/2018
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.brent.gov.uk

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ198844 (520084,184756)

Size in hectares:
6.79

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
No

Tree Preservation Order:
Not known

Nature Conservation Area:
Yes - Boro Importance II - see note

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
Green Chain. Nature Conservation area: north tips and R Brent corridor

Fuller information

Tokyngton Recreation Ground was created in the 1980s to compensate for the loss of parkland when the North Circular Road was widened. The area's former name of Monks Park derives from the Neeld family, money-lenders to George III, who owned land in the Tokyngton area and lived in Monk's Park at Corsham, near Bath. Sir Audley Dallas Neeld developed the area here and at Wembley. St Raphael’s Open Space, on the east side of the Brent river, was created when St Raphael's Estate was being built. Construction began at the end of WWII but the estate continued to be added to over the following decades. As it runs through the park, the river is partly contained between high walls but in some areas has a more natural setting. In the north part of Tokyngton Recreation Ground are remains of a bowling green and conifers in this area are a remnant of the more formal layout of the original park. In 2012, as part of environmental improvements in the park, a structure known as the Climate Pavilion was built in the park. Designed by architect Mark Smith, the pavilion has four overlapping roof sections that symbolise the damage done to buildings by flooding and beneath it are underground ponds that form part of the flood protection system. It is used as an outdoor classroom and nearby are information panels about climate change created by pupils of Oakington Manor School. A footbridge across the river connects Tokyngton Recreation Ground with St Raphael's Open Space. On a mound near the footbridge, the base of one of the flagpoles from the Twin Towers of the old Wembley Stadium was installed in June 2003, presented by Wembley National Stadium Ltd. Both parks have various recreational facilities, with serpentine paths meandering through the undulating landscape.

Sources consulted:

Ian Yarham, Meg Game 'Nature Conservation in Brent, Ecology Handbook 31', London Ecology Unit, 2000, p. 65. John Goodier notes, 2017

Page Top

Discover. Visit. Research. Explore.