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London Road Cemetery Bromley

Summary

London Road Cemetery is the oldest of Bromley's cemeteries and opened in 1877, laid out by architect George Truefitt, whose two ragstone chapels connected by a porte-cochère and a mortuary remain, although his lodge has since been rebuilt. The layout has cruciform drives with a central circular area, and the planting includes Cedars, Scots pine and other conifers with later flowering 'cemetery trees'.

Basic Details

Previous / Other name:
Beckenham Cemetery

Site location:
Warner Road, Bromley

Postcode:
BR1 3RR ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Cemetery

Date(s):
1877

Designer(s):
George Truefitt

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Bromley

Site ownership:
LB Bromley

Site management:
Cemeteries Office (contracted to English Landscapes)

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
Daily 10am-4pm (October-March)/ 10am-7pm (April-September)

Special conditions:

Facilities:
Toilets

Events:

Public transport:
Rail: Bromley North then bus.

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/04/2002
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.bromley.gov.uk

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ398701

Size in hectares:
1.944

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
No

Tree Preservation Order:
No

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
None

Fuller information

London Road Cemetery is the oldest of Bromley's cemeteries and opened in 1877, laid out by architect George Truefitt, who won the competition for its design and whose Gothic style buildings remain largely intact. These comprise two ragstone chapels connected by a porte-cochère and a mortuary, although his lodge has since been rebuilt. The cemetery retains its decorative iron gates although some of the boundary railings have since gone. The layout has cruciform drives with a central circular area, and the planting includes Cedars, Scots pine and other conifers with later flowering 'cemetery trees'. There is a fine granite column commemorating William Digby (d.1901), a notable sarcophagus to the Johnson family and marble railed memorial to the Tweedy family. Among notable people buried here are Major General Henry Babbage (1825-1918), whose father was Charles Babbage (1791-1871), the pioneer who designed - but failed to build - the first automatic computing engines in the 1820s; Sir Edward Scott (d.1883), banker and Sheriff of Kent in 1878; Sir Ralph Forster (d.1930), Deputy Lieutenant for Surrey; and Horace, Earl Farquhar (d.1923), Master of Edward VII's Household and Lord Steward from 1915-22. The cemetery is now full.

Sources consulted:

B Cherry & N Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 2: South' (1983, reprint 1999) p167; Hugh Meller & Brian Parsons, 'London Cemeteries, An Illustrated Guide and Gazetteer', 4th edition (The History Press, 2008), pp87/8.

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