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Plaistow Cemetery Bromley
   
Summary: Plaistow Cemetery was set up by the Burial Board in 1892 and opened in 1893, the second oldest cemetery in Bromley. It has a simple layout with at the entrance a massive ragstone lodge over the drive and an Early English style chapel both designed by local architect W R Mallett. The cemetery has a grid of straight paths, the main one running north to south from the entrance lodge, past the chapel, to a turning circle at the far end; the remaining paths are narrower. On its east side it abuts King's Meadow. There are a number of mature trees, including Scots pine and some specimen trees along the main avenue.
Previous / Other name:
Site location: Burnt Ash Lane, Bromley
Postcode: BR1 5AF > Google Map
Type of site: Cemetery
Date(s): 1892/3
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
Borough: Bromley
Site ownership: LB Bromley
Site management: Cemeteries Office (contracted to English Landscapes)
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: Daily 10am-4pm (October-March)/ 10am-7pm (April-September). Chapel only open for funeral services.
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Rail: Sundridge Park. Bus: 126, 261, 336
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/11/2007
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.bromley.gov.uk

Fuller information:

Plaistow Cemetery was set up by the Burial Board in 1892 and opened in 1893, the second oldest cemetery in Bromley. The land for the cemetery was provided by Lady Scott of Sundridge Park, later Lady Farquhar, and her first husband, Sir Edward Scott, were great benefactors of St Mary's Church Plaistow (q.v.). Plaistow Cemetery has a simple layout with at the entrance a massive ragstone lodge over the drive and an Early English style chapel, both designed by W R Mallett, a local Bromley architect who was responsible for much work on St Mary's Church Plaistow. The cemetery has a grid of straight paths, the main one running north to south from the entrance lodge, past the chapel, to a turning circle at the far end; the remaining paths are narrower, for pedestrian use. The chapel is at the end of the enclosed part of the Avenue, with lawn and two small rose beds adjacent, and from here the cemetery opens out to the west.

The cemetery abuts King's Meadow on its east side and the boundary here consists of lapboard fence and modern metal railings of 2005/6. There are a number of mature trees, including Scots pine and some specimen trees along the main avenue, including silver birch and flowering cherry and a young gingko. A row of four small-leaved lime trees and Leylandii mark the southern boundary, with mixed shrubbery and hedging on west and north boundaries.

Among those buried here are Joseph Johnson, Curator of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Belfast (1839-1906); James Laidlaw (1836-1921), pioneer missionary of the English Presbyterian Church in Formosa (now Taiwan); Roger Yelverton (1845-1912), Chief Justice of the Bahamas and 'Chairman of the League of Criminal Appeal by whose agitation a Court of Appeal has been secured' [in 1907]'. There are 34 Commonwealth War Graves Commission graves here in the south-west corner and other graves to service personnel. In the north part of the cemetery is an unusual large headstone to the family of E and A Neumayer (1915-48), and another grave of local interest is that of Samuel Cawston (1843-1919) and family of Bromley Hill. Cawston bought the Bromley Hill house and land that had belonged to Lord and Lady Farnborough and after 1881 he 'speedily developed the land for building purposes'; by 1929 'a network of roads and villas had replaced the gardens, the wooded glades and the spring-shores of the past' (E L S Horsburgh, p.246). Today Bromley Hill is the Bromley Court Hotel. The cemetery was designed to take 3443 graves and is now full, used only for burials in existing graves.

Sources consulted:

Hugh Meller & Brian Parsons, 'London Cemeteries, An Illustrated Guide and Gazetteer', 4th edition (The History Press, 2008); C Webb revised ed of P Wolfston 'Greater London Cemeteries and Crematoria', Society of Genealogists, 1994; B Cherry and N Pevsner, The Buildings of England, London 2: South, 1983 (1999 ed), p.167.

LPGT Volunteer Research by Peter Smith & Jeff Royce, 2007
Grid ref: TQ405707
Size in hectares: 1.62
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation:
   

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