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Fishmongers' Hall Garden City of London
   
Summary: The Fishmongers' Company has its origins in at least the C12th and was granted its first Charter in 1272. The Company has had premises here since the C16th, the current Hall built in 1831-35 to replace an earlier hall when part of its site was needed for the new London Bridge Approach. Additional offices were built it 1976/7 facing Upper Thames Street and Swan Lane, at which time the courtyard between the wings was enlarged and laid out as a small garden open to the river. It is on two levels and largely paved with a flower border and a few trees. A statue of James Hulbert, benefactor of the Fishmongers' Company, was brought from the Fishmongers' Almshouses at Bray in Berkshire, and on one wall are the arms from the entrance of the C17th Hall.
Previous / Other name:
Site location: off Swan Lane Lower Thames Street/London Bridge Approach
Postcode: EC4R 9EL > Google Map
Type of site: Private Garden
Date(s): 1831-5; 1977/8
Designer(s):
Listed structures: LBII* and SAM: Fishmongers Hall
Borough: City of London
Site ownership: The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers
Site management: The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers
Open to public? Occasionally
Opening times: Visits by appointment may be possible, plus tours and open days. Contact the Fishmongers' Company
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Monument (District, Circle) / Bank (Central, DLR, Northern, Waterloo & City); Cannon Street (District, Circle). Bus: 63, 242
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/12/2002
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.fishhall.co.uk

Fuller information:

The Fishmongers' Company has its origins in at least the C14th with the Stockfishmongers (traders in wet fish) and the Saltfishmongers (traders in dried fish) and trading on the Thames riverside dates from at least the C13th. The Hall is on the site of previous premises of three important fish-merchants John Lovekyn, Sir William Walworth and William Askham, all one-time Mayors of London, who came here in the late C14th and provided business facilities for the trade including a great hall. The Hall was secured for the Fishmongers' Company in 1433-44 with assistance from, among others, Henry IV's brother-in-law, John Cornwall, Baron Fanhope. The Company built new wharfside premises here and until 1666 had sole use of the wharf, but from 1669 and 1827 there was public pedestrian access. It later again became a private wharf between 1835 and 1975. In the C2nd the area west of the Hall was a Roman quay, and later a medieval house, remnants of which were found in 1974 when the area was excavated. The medieval hall was destroyed in the Great Fire in 1666, although the proximity to the river enabled much of the important documents and other items to be saved. Following the fire the Company was able to acquire more land and the new premises were built around three sides of a courtyard.

The current Hall was designed by Henry Roberts in 1831-35 who won the competition to replace the earlier hall when part of its site was needed for the new London Bridge Approach. Additional offices were built it 1976/7 facing Upper Thames Street and Swan Lane, at which time the courtyard between the wings was enlarged and is laid out as a small garden open to the river, from which it is partially visible through railings. It is largely laid to paving and is on two levels, with a flower border and two or three trees. In 1978 a stone statue of the benefactor of the Fishmongers' Company, James Hulbert by Robert Easton, dated 1728, was brought here from the Fishmongers' Almshouses at Bray in Berkshire. The stone arms from the C17th Hall's entrance are on the wall.

Sources consulted:

Simon Bradley & Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 1: The City of London', 1997 (1999 ed.)
Grid ref: TQ328806
Size in hectares: 0.0701
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: Yes - Thames Policy Area
Other LA designation: Strategic Viewing Corridor; Monument Views and Setting
   

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