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St James Garlickhythe Church City of London

Summary

St James Garlickhythe is probably so-called due to its proximity to a hithe or wharf where garlic was landed and sold. The earliest date of a church here is 1170; it was rebuilt in 1326 probably through the will of Sheriff Richard Rothing. Among others buried here were Richard Lions, a wine merchant beheaded by Wat Tyler's rebels, and a number of Lord Mayors of London of the C14th, C15th and C16th. In 1808 the churchyard was enclosed by iron railings and in 1814/5 a small engine house for the parish fire engine was erected at the north east corner, surviving until WWII. New railings and gates ornamented with grape vines were donated by the Vintners' Company in c.1965 enclosing the small area of churchyard that remains in front of the church. A bronze statue of 'The Barge Master and Swan Marker of the Vintners Company' is installed in the landscaped area to the west of the church.

Basic Details

Site location:
Upper Thames Street/Skinners Lane/Garlick Hill

Postcode:
EC4V 2AF ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Churchyard

Date(s):
medieval; 1676

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
LBI: St James Garlickhythe

Borough:
City of London

Site ownership:
Diocese of London

Site management:
Church (landscaping to west of church maintained by City of London Corporation Open Spaces Dept.

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
As church: Mon-Fri 10am-4pm

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Tube: Mansion House (District, Circle)

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/06/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/openspaces

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ323808

Size in hectares:
0.0137

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Queen Street

Tree Preservation Order:
No

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
Yes - St Paul's Heights Policy Area

Other LA designation:
Strategic Viewing Corridor

St James Garlickhythe Church

St James Garlickhythe Church and Landscaped Area to West, June 2010. Photo: S Williams

Click photo to enlarge.

Fuller information

The church of St James Garlickhythe is probably so-called due to its proximity to a hithe or wharf where garlic was landed and sold. The earliest date of a church here is 1170; it was rebuilt in 1326 probably by Sheriff Richard Rothing who was buried here and left money in his will for the church. By 1481 the church had numerous chantries and a guild, and the church was granted collegiate status. This was dissolved in the 1540s, the resulting loss of income to the church made up by increasing the number of in-church burials. Among those buried here were Richard Lions, a wine merchant beheaded in Cheapside by Wat Tyler's rebels, and a number of Lord Mayors of London of the C14th, C15th and C16th. The church was repaired in the 1620s and 1630s but then destroyed in 1666 and rebuilt by Wren by 1683, the steeple probably by Hawksmoor dates from 1714-17; further restoration took place in 1838. In 1808 the churchyard in front was enclosed by iron railings; in 1814/5 a small engine house for the parish fire engine was erected at the north east corner of the churchyard, which survived until World War II. A north-east vault was built and when burial vaults were cleared a mummified body was found in the chancel. The vaults were officially closed in 1853/4. New railings and gates ornamented with grape vines were donated by the Vintners' Company in c.1965 in front of the small area of churchyard which remains in front of the church.

To the west is a paved landscaped area with planters, shrubs and some trees, screening the traffic of Upper Thames Street. A bronze statue of 'The Barge Master and Swan Marker of the Vintners Company' is installed in the landscaped area by the church.

Sources consulted:

Simon Bradley & Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 1: The City of London', 1997 (1999 ed.); George Godwin & John Britton 'The Churches of London: A history and description of the Ecclesiastical Edifices of the Metropolis, Volume II', London, 1839; Philip Norman, 'The London City Churches, Their Use, Their Preservation and Their Extended Use', The London Society, (1920s); London Diocesan Advisory Committee for the Care of Churches data

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