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St Martin Orgar Churchyard City of London
   

St Martin Orgar Churchyard

St Martin Orgar Churchyard, June 2010. Photo: S Williams

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The church of St Martin Orgar formerly stood here, its name arising from a Deacon called Ordgarus who owned the church, which he presented prior to c.1181 to the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's. It had a churchyard by c.1250. The building was damaged but not entirely destroyed in the Great Fire and part of the tower and nave were subsequently repaired and converted as a meeting place and chapel for French Huguenot Protestants. By c.1820 this had become ruinous and all but the tower was demolished, which acted as the entrance to the burial ground for the parish of St Clement and now occupied the site of the old church. The former churchyard remains as a raised garden in private use.
St Martin Orgar Churchyard, June 2010. Photo: S Williams
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Previous / Other name:
Site location: Martin Lane
Postcode: EC4R 0AU > Google Map
Type of site: Private Garden
Date(s): medieval; C17th
Designer(s):
Listed structures: LBII: Railing, wall and gates to former churchyard
Borough: City of London
Site ownership: Diocese of London
Site management: private
Open to public? No
Opening times: private, visible from roadway
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Monument (District, Circle) / Bank (Central, Waterloo and City, Northern, DLR)
St Martin Orgar Churchyard, June 2010. Photo: S Williams
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The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/06/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news.

Fuller information:

St Martin Orgar formerly stood in Martin Lane, its name arising from a Deacon called Ordgarus who had owned the church prior to c.1181 and which he presented to the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's. Martin Lane was once notorious for moneylenders. St Martin Orgar had a churchyard by c.1250. The church was damaged in the Great Fire of 1666 after which the parish was joined to that of St Clement Eastcheap (q.v.). The church was not entirely destroyed in the Fire and part of the tower and nave were subsequently repaired and converted as a meeting place and chapel for French Huguenot Protestants. By c.1820 this had become ruinous and all but the tower was demolished, the latter acting as the entrance to what became the burial ground for the parish of St Clement, on the site of the old church. Remains of the medieval church were discovered during excavations in 1987. When Cannon Street was widened in 1847 the tower was demolished, but rebuilt in 1851as a rectory for St Clements, and the old bell was re-hung as a clock bell in a projecting clock, and it is now used as offices. It is likely to be the bells of St Martin Orgar that are referred to in the nursery rhyme Oranges and Lemons: 'You owe me five farthings, Say the bells of St Martins'. .

Sources consulted:

Simon Bradley & Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 1: The City of London', 1997 (1999 ed.); George Godwin & John Britton 'The Churches of London: A history and description of the Ecclesiastical Edifices of the Metropolis, Volume II', London, 1839; London Diocesan Advisory Committee for the Care of Churches data
Grid ref: TQ328808
Size in hectares: 0.0466
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation: Strategic Viewing Corridor
   

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