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St Pancras Churchyard City of London
   

St Pancras Churchyard

St Pancras Churchyard, November 2002. Photo: S Williams

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This was the site of the medieval church of St Pancras Soper Lane, which was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, after which the parish joined that of St Mary Le Bow. Land had been granted for St Pancras Churchyard in 1379 and it was used as a burial ground until the C19th. It was converted into a garden post WWII and the small site is surrounded on three sides by buildings and has a few trees, but no evidence of gravestones. The front boundary wall has a plaque recording the site of St Pancras church.
Previous / Other name: St Pancras Soper Lane
Site location: Pancras Lane
Postcode: EC4 > Google Map
Type of site: Private Garden
Date(s): Medieval origin
Designer(s):
Listed structures: SAM: remains of St Pancras Church
Borough: City of London
Site ownership: Diocese of London
Site management: Diocese of London
Open to public? No
Opening times: locked but visible
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Bank (Central, DLR, Northern, Waterloo & City) / Monument (Circle, District)
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/05/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news.

Fuller information:

Burial ground of the former church of St Pancras Soper Lane which was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, after which the parish joined that of St Mary-le-Bow (q.v.). The medieval parish of St Pancras Soper Lane lay to the south of Cheapside, largely to the east of what was later laid out in the early C13th as a medieval street called Soper Lane, now formed as Queen Street. Soper Lane ran north-south, its southern boundary Watling Street. A small part of the parish extended west of Queen Street but it was mainly eastwards, meeting Bucklersbury at its north-eastern corner and extending south-east almost as far as what is now Queen Victoria Street. In 1963 excavations revealed the medieval church had a nave of c.6metres in width and a C12th chancel. Land was granted for a churchyard in 1379 and was used as a burial ground until the C19th. The site is surrounded on three sides by buildings and is largely gravelled with a few trees, no evidence of gravestones, surrounded by low concrete rendered wall into which is set a plaque recording the site of St Pancras church. Also in Pancras Lane was the burial ground of St Benet Sherehog until the 1930s, the church destroyed in 1666 and the parish united with that of St Stephen Walbrook but burials continued.

Sources consulted:

Simon Bradley & Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 1: The City of London', 1997 (1999 ed.); London Diocesan Advisory Committee for the Care of Churches data; Website of St Mary-le-Bow www.stmarylebow.co.uk
Grid ref: TQ324810
Size in hectares: 0.021
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation: Strategic View - Consultation Area
   

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