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Tallow Chandlers' Hall Courtyard City of London

Summary

The Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers dates from the C14th and bought the site here in 1476. The present Tallow Chandlers' Hall was built in 1671-3 after an earlier building was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666. It has a small courtyard garden reached through ornamental iron gates on Dowgate Hill. A small external garden was created in 1978 on the corner of Dowgate Hill and Cannon Street by Past Master and Mrs Deverell Stone in memory of their son Mark.

Basic Details

Site location:
4 Dowgate Hill

Postcode:
EC4R 2SH ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Private Garden

Date(s):
1476; 1671-73

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
LBI and SAM: Tallow Chandlers' Hall

Borough:
City of London

Site ownership:
The Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers

Site management:
The Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers

Open to public?
Occasionally

Opening times:
private, but some public access on 2 open days p.a. plus organised tours

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Tube: Cannon Street (District, Circle). Rail: Cannon Street

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/06/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.tallowchandlers.org

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ325808

Size in hectares:
0.0136

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Queen Street

Tree Preservation Order:
No

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
Strategic Viewing Corridor

Tallow Chandlers' Hall Courtyard

View to Inner Courtyard, Tallow Chandlers' Hall, June 2010. Photo: S Williams

Click photo to enlarge.

Fuller information

The Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers originated in 1300 when 'oynters' or tallow (animal fat) melters formed a religious fraternity in order to regulate oils, ointments, lubricants and fat-based preservatives and also to manage tallow candle-making. In 1456 the fraternity was granted a coat of arms and in 1462 became a Livery Company. By 1415 tallow candles were being used to light the streets of the City of London and by 1469 the Tallow Chandlers' Company was supplying 60 men to the City Watch to ensure this was carried out. The importance of the Company's role diminished from the C18th with the introduction of materials other than tallow for candles, then the use of gas and subsequently electricity for street lighting. In 1476 the Company purchased the site here from Dame Margaret Alley for £16 13s 4d, probably a merchant's house. The buried walls of the Roman Governor's Palace are reputedly beneath the property. The present Hall was built in 1671-3 after an earlier building was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666. It is believed to have been designed by the Company's Surveyor, Captain John Caines, under the guidance of Robert Hooke. Although some refurbishment has taken place over the years and some parts were damaged in WWII bombing, the shape and layout of the C17th Hall is little changed. It has a small courtyard reached through ornamental iron gates on Dowgate Hill, which has an olive tree at least 50 years old among other plants, mainly in tubs. In the 1960s, F E Cleary refers to a thriving catalpa tree in the courtyard in his book 'The Flowering City'.

A small external garden was created on the corner of Dowgate Hill and Cannon Street by Past Master and Mrs Deverell Stone in memory of their son Mark, in 1978.

Sources consulted:

Simon Bradley & Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 1: The City of London', 1997 (1999 ed.);pp.407/9; F E Cleary, 'The Flowering City', The City Press, 1969; history on Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers website

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