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All Saints Churchyard, Sanderstead Croydon
   
Summary: All Saints Churchyard is the burial ground of the medieval parish church of Sanderstead, mentioned in the Domesday Book. The lych-gate is original but was moved to its current site in the 1920s/30s, and has since been restored. In the churchyard is the grave of Sir Francis Bond Head (d.1875), once Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada and author of 'Rides across the Pampas'. A separate graveyard is situated across the road from the church.
Previous / Other name: Sanderstead Parish Church
Site location: Onslow Gardens/Addington Road, Sanderstead
Postcode: CR2 8RN > Google Map
Type of site: Churchyard
Date(s): 1230 onwards
Designer(s):
Listed structures: LBI: All Saints Church
Borough: Croydon
Site ownership: Diocese of Southwark
Site management: Church
Open to public? Yes
Opening times:
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Rail: Sanderstead then bus.
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/12/2008
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.sanderstead-parish.org.uk

Fuller information:

A reference to a church at Sanderstead appears in Duke Elfred's will of 871. In c.964, Athelfleda, mother of Edmund King and Martyr and wife of King Edgar, gave Sanderstead and its church to the Abbott and Convent of Hyde in Winchester, and 'Sonderstede' parish and its church are mentioned in the Domesday Book in 1086, held by the Abbey of St Peter at Westminster. The name may arise from 'sandy place'. The church is situated on the top of the hill, nearly 600 ft above sea level, and the current building is flint and stone, partly Perpendicular style. The earliest parts to remain today are the eastern arch on the north side of the nave and the piscina, dating from c.1230, but the church was largely built in around 1250, with a tower added c.1310, the lower stage of which was built inside the church walls and the western arch built up to carry the weight with buttresses added outside. A low broach tower covered in shingles surmounted the tower, and the roof tiles were formerly wooden slats. The register dates from 1565 and there are remnants of C14th building but when the church was restored in 1832 it 'was robbed of antiquarian interest . . . Having fallen into a very bad state of repair' (Walford). Pevsner describes its 'very curious tower' . 'Dogwipper' benches used by shepherds to keep an eye on their flocks during services remain at the back of the church.

The main entrance is original but the porch has been replaced. Large windows were added at the east and west ends of the name, and a new window was added to the north aisle in the C16th, although none of the windows seen today are original. The church has numerous fine monuments and paintings including depictions of St Edmund King and Martyr and St Edmund Archbishop of Canterbury, and Royal Arms of Charles I. The church was damaged by incendiary bombs in 1941, damaging the roof and nave.

The lych-gate is original but was moved to its current site in the 1920s/30s, and has since been restored. In the churchyard is the grave of Sir Francis Bond Head (d.1875), once Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada and author of 'Rides across the Pampas'. A separate graveyard is situated across the road from the church.

Sources consulted:

See parish website: www.sanderstead-parish.org.uk; B Cherry & N Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 2: South' (1983 reprint 1999; Edward Walford 'Village London, The Story of Greater London Part 3: South East and South', first published 1883/4 and reprinted in 1983 by The Alderman Press; LB Croydon, 'Local List of Historic Parks & Gardens', December 2008
Grid ref: TQ341614
Size in hectares:
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List: Yes
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: Not known
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: Yes - Archaeological Priority Zone
Other LA designation: Local Open Land (graveyard across road)
   

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