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Riddlesdown Croydon
   
Summary: Riddlesdown is first recorded in 1331, at that time called 'Ridelsdoune' meaning 'cleared woodland on a hill' and there is evidence of early human activity. In medieval times Kenley Common and Riddlesdown formed part of the waste land of the Manor of Watendone. In 1883, to prevent the Lord of the Manor from enclosing the commonland further, the Corporation of London acquired most of Riddlesdown 'for public recreation and enjoyment' and 'to preserve the natural aspect'. The Gardener's Pleasure Resort established nearby in 1892 was popular with Victorian day trippers.
Previous / Other name: Riddlesdoune; Riddlesdown Common
Site location: Riddlesdown Road/Honister Heights, Kenley
Postcode: CR8 1BX > Google Map
Type of site: Public Open Land
Date(s): ancient; 1883
Designer(s):
Listed structures: SAM: Newe Ditch
Borough: Croydon
Site ownership: City of London Corporation (small area owned by LB Croydon)
Site management: City of London Corporation (LB Croydon Parks and Open Spaces). Riddlesdown Conservation Committee
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities: Car park, footpaths, bridleways
Events:
Public transport: Rail: Kenley. Bus: 407, 412
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/12/2008
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.corpoflondon.gov.uk; www.croydon.gov.uk

Fuller information:

Riddlesdown is within the West Wickham and Coulsdon Commons group of 6 areas managed by Corporation of London, 3 others of which are in Croydon: Farthing Downs, Kenley Common and Coulsdon Common. Riddlesdown is first recorded in 1331, at that time called Ridelsdoune and meaning 'cleared woodland on a hill'. Evidence of early human activity has been found here, such as Neolithic or New Stone Age axes, possible traces of Iron Age fields and Riddlesdown Road was a Roman trade route. 1962 3 graves were excavated possibly connected with a Saxon cemetery found at the junction of Riddlesdown Avenue and Mitchley Avenue. In medieval times Kenley Common and Riddlesdown formed part of the waste land of the Manor of Watendone; the lord of the manor did not have exclusive use of this commonland, the Statute of Merton having guaranteed the rights of commoners in 1235 to the products of the soil, pasture for livestock, and gathering material for fuel, livestock bedding and roofing. However when the value of the land increased following the coming of the railways in C19th, the then Lord of the Manor of Coulsdon, Edmund Byron, began enclosing and appropriating some 150 acres of land at Hartley Down. One neighbouring landowner, William Hall, refused to sell his land to Byron and eventually approached the Corporation of London with an offer to sell his land and commoners rights in the hopes that the Corporation would protect the land from further encroachment as it had done in Epping. As a result the Corporation negotiated with Byron for ownership of Kenley Common and in 1883 347 acres were purchased, which excluded the commonland already enclosed and sold to others.

Riddlesdown and Kenley Common were acquired under the powers of the Corporation of London (Open Spaces) Act 1878 'for public recreation and enjoyment' and 'to preserve the natural aspect'. In 1884, the Croydon to Oxted railway line was completed and at the foot of Riddlesdown the Gardener's Pleasure Resort was established here in 1892, popular with Victorian day trippers. A small area is managed by LB Croydon

Sources consulted:

Winterman, M A, Croydon's parks: an illustrated history (LB Croydon, 1988) p78; Kenley Aerodrome Conservation Area Proposals Statement (draft), 2005
Grid ref: TQ322605
Size in hectares: 43
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
Common exempted under 1965 Act
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List: No
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: Yes - Metropolitan Importance + SSSI (part)
Green Belt: Yes
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: Yes - Archaeological Priority Zone. Ancient Monument
Other LA designation: Part of AP2; SSSI. Earthwork: Archaeological Site of National Importance
   

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