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St Peter's Churchyard Croydon
   
Summary: St Peter's Churchyard is a well-planted churchyard, now closed to burial. St Peter's Church was built in 1849-51, later rebuilt in 1865, and is on a prominent site. The land for the churchyard was given by John Russell who died in 1864 and is buried near the tower. The churchyard has flint boundary walls and a good coverage of mature tree, its path layout little changed. Among those buried here are a number of prominent local businessmen, a former huntsman turned inn-keeper of the Stag and Hounds, and Colonel Edward Kelly, who fought in the Battle of Waterloo. A yew tree was planted to the south east side of the church to mark the Millennium.
Previous / Other name:
Site location: St Peter's Road, South Croydon
Postcode: CR0 1HG > Google Map
Type of site: Churchyard
Date(s): 1850s
Designer(s):
Listed structures: LBII: St Peter's Church
Borough: Croydon
Site ownership: Church of England, Diocese of Southwark
Site management: LB Croydon Parks and Open Spaces; Friends of St Peter's Church; GASP (Gardeners of St Peters)
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Rail: Croydon c.100m to east. Bus: 403, 412, 455, 64, T33
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/12/2008
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.southcroydonbenefice.org.uk/friends

Fuller information:

St Peter's Churchyard is a well-planted flint-walled churchyard, now closed to burial. St Peter's Church was built in 1849-51 designed by Sir G G Scott, one of whose aunts was buried here. A spire was placed on the tower in 1864 but was burnt down before it was finished, and the church was rebuilt and completed in 1865. On a prominent site, St Peter's can be seen from many vantage points in Croydon.

The land for the churchyard was given by John Russell of Dunlewey House, Bedford Park who died in July 1864 and is buried near the northern side of the tower. There are a number of local businessmen buried in the churchyard including on the south-east side of the church. Among them are Mr Budgen, principal watch maker of Croydon; Mr Cuthbert William Johnson, Chairman on the Local Board of Health; and Mr Bartlett, who has a street nearby named after him. Several local publicans' graves are here including that of James Roffey, huntsman to the stag hounds kept in the neighbourhood who then became inn-keeper of the Stag and Hounds, a local public house. There is a also a memorial to Colonel Edward Kelly, who took an active part in the Battle of Waterloo, was praised by the Duke of Wellington in his dispatches, and died in India in 1828. A gravestone on the south west side of the church marks the grave of Colonel Alfred Bate Richards, editor of the Morning Advertiser, and author of a play called 'Cromwell' performed at the Queen’s Theatre, London.

The churchyard has good coverage of mature trees, which include holly, yew in abundance, specimen trees, lime, Lombardy poplar; there are curving paths running through the ground and some with candy-twist edging tiles. The original layout of the paths remains, although a new ramped path has been added to the vestry entrance in 2008. The churchyard is closed to burials and is looked after by LB Croydon and a voluntary church gardening group (since 1999). A yew tree was planted to the south east side of the church to mark the Millennium. The shrub beds around the church were replanted in 2001 by the voluntary group with a grant from the council as part of the Smarter Croydon initiative. See booklet (1960s) giving information on graves.

Sources consulted:

Cherry, B and Pevsner, N, The Buildings of England London 2: South (1983) p211; LB Croydon, 'Local List of Historic Parks & Gardens', December 2008
Grid ref: TQ327644
Size in hectares: 0.5
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List: Yes
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: Yes - Local Area of Special Character
Other LA designation: Local Open Land. In AP2.
   

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