London Gardens Online
Record
London Gardens Online

SITE DETAILS

Edmonton Federation Cemetery Enfield

Summary

Edmonton Federation Cemetery was set up in 1889 by the Federation of Synagogues Burial Society on land donated for the purpose by Samuel Montagu, banker, philanthropist and MP, who was a key instigator in establishing the Federation in 1887. Previously called Jeremys Green Lane, Montagu Road was renamed after him. The Federation Cemetery is the largest of the three cemeteries that abut each other here, and is largely devoid of planting. Many prominent rabbis are buried in the western section, including Rabbi Eliezer Gordon from Telz (d.1910); thousands of people attended the addresses in the East End prior to his burial.

Basic Details

Site location:
Montagu Road, Edmonton

Postcode:
N18 2NF ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Cemetery

Date(s):
1889

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Enfield

Site ownership:
Federation of Synagogues Burial Society

Site management:
Federation of Synagogues Burial Society

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
Private grounds, but open - notice only giving closing time of 5pm (April)

Special conditions:

Facilities:
Toilets

Events:

Public transport:
Tube: Tottenham Hale (Victoria) then bus. Rail: Edmonton Green. Bus: 192

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/09/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.federationofsynagogues.com/burial-society

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ350930

Size in hectares:
8.1 (with Western Syn. Cem)

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Montague Road Cemeteries

Tree Preservation Order:
Not known

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
Included in Local Register of Historic Parks and Gardens

Fuller information

Edmonton Federation Cemetery was set up in 1889 by the Federation of Synagogues Burial Society. The Federation had been set up in 1887, largely at the instigation of Samuel Montagu (1832-1911), a wealthy banker and philanthropist, who was raised to the peerage as Baron Swaythling in 1907, having become a Baronet in 1894. He was elected Liberal MP for Whitechapel in 1885 and identified the need to unify the numerous small and mostly ill-housed Orthodox congregations and chevras that had grown up in the East End. As a result the Federation of Synagogues was formed as an umbrella organisation for these small groups, and its first burial ground was established in Edmonton. The land for the burial ground was donated by Montagu, at that time located on what was then called Jeremys Green Lane, its name subsequently changed to Montagu Road. Montagu's name was given to a number of street names in Edmonton, and to Montagu Road School, since demolished, and is also recalled in Swaythling Close.

The Edmonton Federation Cemetery is the largest of the three cemeteries that abut each other here, separated from Tottenham Park Cemetery (q.v.) by high concrete fencing and from the Cemetery of the Western Synagogue (q.v.), mainly by chain link fencing. Almost the only planting in the cemetery is a number of Lombardy poplars along the boundary with Tottenham Park Cemetery. Separated by a concrete block wall from Montagu Road, the cemetery entrance consists of non-structural brick 'piers' and a cast-iron gate, with a small brick lodge immediately to the left of the wide tarmac roadway that leads into the cemetery, either side of which and on lightly raised ground are rows of graves laid out in very orderly fashion. The roadway leads to a brick information office and toilet block with tiled roof, and then turns to the left towards the brick prayer building. Many prominent rabbis are buried in the western section, including Rabbi Eliezer Gordon from Telz (d.1910); thousands of people attended the addresses in the East End prior to his burial.

Sources consulted:

Webb C, revised ed. of Wolfston, P, Greater London Cemeteries and Crematoria, Society of Genealogists, 3rd ed. 1994. See Federation of Synagogues website, History section; The Paul Drury Partnership for LB Enfield, 'Montagu Road Cemeteries Conservation Area Character Appraisal', 2006

Page Top

Discover. Visit. Research. Explore.