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Enfield Crematorium Enfield
   
Summary: Enfield Crematorium was opened by the Tottenham and Wood Green Burial Board in 1938, and the landscaping of its grounds forms a cohesive whole with the main buildings, which include a pair of chapels connected by a triple-arched arcade. An avenue of horse chestnuts leads from the entrance lodge; formal gardens were created to the east of the crematorium, while a more informal Garden of Remembrance to the north west. A yew-lined approach from Great Cambridge Road is flanked by a series of hedged and walled geometrical gardens.
Previous / Other name:
Site location: Great Cambridge Road, Enfield Wash
Postcode: EN1 4DS > Google Map
Type of site: Cemetery
Date(s): 1938
Designer(s): Sir Guy Dawber & A. R. Fox
Listed structures:
Borough: Enfield
Site ownership: LB Haringey
Site management: LB Haringey Cemeteries Board
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: 8.30am to 6pm
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Rail: Turkey Street. Bus: 217, 317, 310, 311
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/03/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.haringey.gov.uk

Fuller information:

Enfield Crematorium was opened by the Tottenham and Wood Green Burial Board in 1938, a remarkable comprehensively designed 1930s crematorium and gardens with two red-brick gabled and pan-tiled chapels connected by a triple-arched arcade and either side of a central clock tower designed by Sir Guy Dawber, Wilson & Fox. There is an avenue of horse chestnut trees from the Lodge at the entrance and a war memorial. To the north-west is little more than a lawn-style Garden of Remembrance with many flowering cherries, but formal gardens and landscaping were created to the east of the Crematorium. Either side of the yew-lined approach from Great Cambridge Road are a series of hedged and walled geometrical gardens, paved walks and shelters in brick in keeping with the main building. The only anachronism is a pair of (mock) C19th urns in one of the gardens. Some gardens are extensively landscaped with ornamental beds, ponds, shrubs and trees, rock gardens and various rose gardens. Trees and shrubs are planted throughout, with the area behind the buildings more open with gravestones among grass.

Sources consulted:

Webb C, revised ed. of Wolfston, P, Greater London Cemeteries and Crematoria, Society of Genealogists, 3rd ed. 1994; Victoria County History; Bridget Cherry & Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: London 4: North (Penguin, 1998)
Grid ref: TQ348985
Size in hectares: c.20.24
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: Not known
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: Yes
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation: Included in Local Register of Historic Parks and Gardens
   

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