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St John of Jerusalem with Christ Church South Hackney Graveyard Hackney
   
Summary: The church of St John of Jerusalem was built in 1848, replacing a chapel-of-ease of 1806-10 on the north side of Well Street that had become parish church for South Hackney in 1825 when the parish was divided into three. The original spire was lost during WWII, replaced by a new slender spire. The church is surrounded by its churchyard on a large island site with an alley of C19th plane trees, railed graveyard with C20th railings, headstones, and 2 handsome C19th monuments dedicated to the Hopewell and the Framington families. In 1904 footpaths and lighting were provided through the churchyard.
Previous / Other name: South Hackney Parish Church
Site location: Lauriston Road/Church Crescent
Postcode: E9 > Google Map
Type of site: Churchyard
Date(s): 1845-48
Designer(s): Church: E C Hakewill
Listed structures: LBII*: Church of St John of Jerusalem; LBII: wall around churchyard
Borough: Hackney
Site ownership: LB Hackney
Site management: Hackney Parks Service
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: unrestricted in parts; some parts behind railings.
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events: Concerts in church
Public transport: Rail: London Fields. Bus: 277.
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/04/2015
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.hackney.gov.uk

Fuller information:

The present church of St John of Jerusalem, described by Arthur Mee as a 'splendid Gothic Revival church with an entrance porch like a French cathedral' was designed by Edward Charles Hakewill. The church, completed in 1848, replaced the earlier chapel-of-ease on the north side of Well Street as the parish church. This chapel, built in 1806-10 to serve South Hackney, had become the parish church in 1825 when the large parish of Hackney was divided into three; now demolished, its burial ground remains at St Thomas's Burial Ground (q.v.). The original stone spire of St John of Jerusalem was lost during World War II and replaced with a slender copper spire designed by N F Cachemaille-Day, architect to the Diocese of London, who undertook other church restoration projects in Hackney, including St Mary New Church in Stoke Newington.

The church is surrounded by its churchyard on a large island site with an alley of C19th plane trees, railed graveyard with C20th railings, headstones, and two handsome C19th monuments dedicated to the Hopewell and the Framington families. It was consecrated in 1831 and closed for burials in 1868, the churchyard's mid C19th coursed rubble wall with freestone coping remains although the railings are no longer in place. In 1904 footpaths and lighting were provided through the churchyard which had 'become a nuisance to inhabitants' having been 'trespassed and at times put to scandalous use'. The churchyard has C20th holly, and mixed trees.

Sources consulted:

Bridget Cherry & Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: London 4: North (Penguin, 1998); Arthur Mee 'The King's England: London North of the Thames except the City and Westminster' (Hodder & Stoughton Ltd, 1972); David Mander, Strength in the Tower, an Illustrated History of Hackney (Sutton, 1998); Mrs Basil Holmes 'The London Burial Grounds', (London 1896).
Grid ref: TQ356841
Size in hectares:
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Victoria Park
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation: Open Space
   

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