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Margravine Cemetery Hammersmith & Fulham

Summary

Margravine Cemetery was founded as Hammersmith Cemetery in 1869. It later became known as Hammersmith Old Cemetery when Mortlake Cemetery was opened. north lodge and two chapels, one of which was demolished in 1939 and its position is marked by shrubbery. The cemetery retains its original walls and gateway from Margravine Gardens, and once had two chapels; its octagonal mortuary is now a store. The layout consists of a simple axial drive and turning circle from the west entrance and planting within the cemetery is largely deciduous trees.

Basic Details

Previous / Other name:
Hammersmith Cemetery; Hammersmith Old Cemetery; Margravine Road Cemetery

Site location:
Margravine Road, Barons Court

Postcode:
W6 8HA ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Cemetery

Date(s):
1869

Designer(s):
George Saunders

Listed structures:
LBII: Tomb of George Broad; Tomb of Abraham Smith; Tomb of Frederick Harold Young

Borough:
Hammersmith & Fulham

Site ownership:
LB Hammersmith & Fulham

Site management:
Environment Department, Cemeteries and Facilities Office

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
opens Mon-Sat 9am; Sun 10am; closes 4pm (Nov - Jan); 5pm (Oct/Feb); 6pm (Mar/Sep); 7pm (Aug/Apr); 8pm (May - Jul). Xmas Day 10am-3pm

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:
Tree walks

Public transport:
Tube: Barons Court (District, Piccadilly). Bus: 190, 211, 220, 295

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/04/2004
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.lbhf.gov.uk/Directory/Community_and_Living/Birth_marriage_and_death/

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ240782

Size in hectares:
6.53

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Barons Court CA27

Tree Preservation Order:
No

Nature Conservation Area:
Yes - Local Importance

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
Open Space of Borough-wide Importance

Margravine Cemetery

Click photo to enlarge.

Fuller information

Margravine Cemetery is a now managed as public garden, with the old graves grassed over. It was founded as Hammersmith Cemetery in 1869 by Hammersmith Burial Board and laid out by local architect, George Saunders, who designed the Gothic-style north lodge and two chapels, one of which was demolished in 1939 and its position is marked by shrubbery. The octagonal mortuary is now a store. The cemetery has very fine brick walls and gateway from Margravine Gardens. The layout consists of a simple axial drive and turning circle from the west entrance. Planting within the cemetery is largely deciduous trees, with sycamore, lime, poplar and younger specimen trees, and there is beech hedging along many paths. When the cemetery was becoming full, Mortlake Cemetery (q.v.) was established, as a result of which this cemetery was sometimes referred to as Hammersmith Old Cemetery. Interesting memorials include that to bandmaster Tom Brown with a stone cello, and the tomb of Abe Smith, a gold digger in New South Wales who is portrayed in his digger's hut. See Hammersmith Council website Historical Sculptures Search for information on other monuments of note in the cemetery. The cemetery won the Green Flag Award in 2010/11 for the third year in a row. It is once again available for burial.

Sources consulted:

Hugh Meller & Brian Parsons, 'London Cemeteries, An Illustrated Guide and Gazetteer', 4th edition (The History Press, 2008); John Archer, Daniel Keech 'Nature Conservation in Hammersmith & Fulham', Ecology Handbook 25, London Ecology Unit, 1993. See Hammersmith Council website Historical Sculptures Search

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