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Cottons Park Havering

Summary

Cottons Park, originally called Cottons Recreational Ground, takes its name from the estate of the C16th landowner, Nicholas Cotton. The land for the park was acquired by Romford UDC from the Cottons family in 1920 and the park was laid out with planting, paths and a bandstand, beyond which to the north and west were playing fields for rugby, soccer and cricket as well as tennis courts. A children's playground and sand pit were located near the main entrance to the east. During WWII the land was given over for war-time allotments, public air-raid shelters and a decontamination centre was constructed, which was later converted into a pavilion and café. Six wooden sculptures were installed in 2009 to commemorate six civilians who lost their lives in the park during bombing in October 1940.

Basic Details

Previous / Other name:
Cottons Recreational Ground

Site location:
London Road/Recreation Avenue/Pettley Gardens, Romford

Postcode:
RM7 7LN ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Public Park

Date(s):
1920-27

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Havering

Site ownership:
LB Havering

Site management:
Parks and Open Spaces; Friends of Cottons Park

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
closed dusk

Special conditions:

Facilities:
Car park, playground, football/rugby pitches

Events:
Various, including Havering's annual 'Wacky about Wildlife' environmental education programme, and summer festival

Public transport:
Rail: Romford. Bus: 86, 252

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/06/2007
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.havering.gov.uk

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ506886

Size in hectares:
6.44

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
No

Tree Preservation Order:
No

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
None

Fuller information

Cottons Park was originally called Cottons Recreational Ground, the name derived from Nicholas Cotton, who owned Cottons Estate in 1570, with a fine house located near the current Brewery Roundabout on Waterloo Road, a prominent position in the C16th town of Romford. The Cottons family continued to own the estate although the house and grounds, which included paddocks and orchards, fell into dereliction by the C20th. After considerable negotiation with the family solicitors, in 1920 15 acres of estate land was acquired for £4,500 by Romford Urban District Council. The land was cleared and 6 tennis courts and a putting green were laid out; 53 lime trees were donated by R H Page in 1922 and in 1927 it became Cottons Park. Much of the labour was provided by the unemployed under the Unemployment Committee's scheme, and the park was laid out with planting and paths in the area by the main entrance on London Road, from where the path led towards the bandstand. Beyond the bandstand to the north and west were playing fields for rugby, soccer and cricket as well as tennis courts, and a children's playground and sand pit near the main entrance to the east.

During WWII the land was given over for war-time allotments, public air-raid shelters and a decontamination centre was constructed, which was later converted into a pavilion and café. On 17 October 1940 bombing in the area caused the deaths of 6 people in the park as there was no blast wall in front of the public shelter. Six wooden sculptures were installed in the park in 2009 to commemorate these civilians. In 1947 the park was the venue of the joint Romford, Dagenham and Hornchurch Councils 'Three Town Show', which drew large crowds to events at the bandstand. Exhibits included bees and honey, rabbits, poultry, handicrafts, model railway and aquaria, but there was an emphasis on home-grown produce, praised by one of the judges as 'among the best I had seen this year'.

The park was extended in the 1960s when houses backing on to the park in Marks Road were compulsorily purchased and demolished. This was to compensate for land lost to the park when the Rotunda retirement homes were built. Friends of Cottons Park was set up in November 2002 and since that time the park, which had fallen into neglect, has been restored. Facilities today include an outdoor gym, a play area for younger children and a purpose-built activity area for teenage activity, the first provided in Havering, with multi-use ball court, and a skate park opened in 2008. There has been extensive replanting of shrubs and trees to enhance both the entrance to the park and to create year-round colour and interest; seasonal bedding is planted in raised beds near the children's play area, and is funded and maintained by the Friends. The park won a Green Flag Award in 2009.

Sources consulted:

See Brian Evans 'Romford, Collier Row and Gidea Park' (Phillimore) 1994; LB Havering 'Management Plan for Cottons Park from 2008 to 2018', 2008.

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