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Fairkytes Havering
   
Summary: Originally part of the same estate as Langtons, Fairkytes was built in the late C17th, with additional work carried out in the C18th and C19th. The first occupant was Job Alibone, whose son Sir Richard Alibone (d.1688) was the first Catholic to be a Justice of the King's Bench. Occupants in the C19th included Joseph Fry, son of prison reformer and Quaker Elizabeth Fry. A mound still found in the garden was built in Victorian times, apparently to enable the children of the house to see what was happening in the next door Langtons gardens. Hornchurch UDC, having acquired Langtons in 1929, then purchased Fairkytes in 1951 although its garden was not fully incorporated into Langtons pleasure garden. The Council used Fairkytes as a library from 1953 and since 1972 it has been the home of Havering Art Centre.
Previous / Other name: Havering Art Centre
Site location: 51 Billet Lane, Hornchurch
Postcode: RM11 1AX > Google Map
Type of site: Public Gardens
Date(s): C18th
Designer(s):
Listed structures: LBII: Fairkytes House
Borough: Havering
Site ownership: LB Havering
Site management: Leisure & Cultural Services
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: Open to users of the art centre, 10am-10.30pm weekdays, daytime at weekends. Open for Open House
Special conditions:
Facilities: Numerous arts and community facilities
Events: Open for Open House
Public transport: Tube: Hornchurch (District). Rail: Emerson Park. Bus: 193, 248, 252, 256, 324, 348, 370, 373
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/06/2007
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.havering.gov.uk

Fuller information:

Originally part of the same estate as Langtons (q.v.), references to which date back to 1520, Fairkytes house was built in the late C17th as a private residence. The house had additional work carried out to it in the C18th and C19th. The first occupant was Job Alibone, an officer of the London Post Office, whose son Sir Richard Alibone was the first Catholic to be a Justice of the King's Bench. He died in 1688 and is commemorated by a monument in Dagenham Parish Church of St Peter's and St Paul's (q.v.). Occupants in the C19th included Joseph Fry, son of prison reformer and Quaker Elizabeth Fry who had strong connections in this area of London. He lived here from 1870 until his death in 1896. Joseph, his wife and their children undertook much philanthropic work, particularly daughter Augusta who worked for the Elizabeth Fry Refugee Fund in Hackney on behalf of women prisoners and then in the 1870s worked towards mitigating the hardship of people in France during the Franco-Prussian War. A mound that still exists in the garden at Fairkytes was built in Victorian times, apparently to enable the children of the house to see what was happening in the next door Langtons gardens.

Hornchurch Urban District Council, having acquired the adjacent Langtons in 1929, then purchased Fairkytes in 1951 although the garden was not fully incorporated into Langtons pleasure garden. The Council has used Fairkytes as a library from 1953 and since 1972 it has been the home of Havering Arts Centre.

Sources consulted:

Sydney Porter, Hornchurch UDC - Report on Parks and Recreation Grounds, September 1961; Hornchurch's Heritage, LB Havering booklet, 1999; John Drury, 'Treasures of Havering', Ian Henry Publications, 1998
Grid ref: TQ538874
Size in hectares:
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List: Yes
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Langtons
Tree Preservation Order: Not known
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation:
   

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