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SITE DETAILS

Highbury Quadrant Congregational Church Islington

Summary

The island site occupied by Highbury Quadrant Congregational Church has a garden area enclosed by a low brick parapet. The Congregational Church was established here in 1878 and was formerly at the centre of residential terraced houses, now replaced by council blocks of the Highbury Quadrant Estat, built by the LCC in 1955/6.

Basic Details

Site location:
Highbury Quadrant

Postcode:
N5 2TE ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Private Garden

Date(s):
1878

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Islington

Site ownership:
The Congregational Church

Site management:
The Congregational Church

Open to public?
Occasionally

Opening times:
gate locked but may be open when church in use

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Rail/Tube: Finsbury Park then bus. Bus: 4, 19, 236.

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/04/2004
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.congregational.org.uk/content.aspx?id=556

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ321861

Size in hectares:

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
No

Tree Preservation Order:
No

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
Shopping Policy Area

Fuller information

The east and north sides of the church grounds are enclosed by wire mesh fencing, with gates at the western apex of the triangular site. Planting includes notable ash, robinia, field maple and lime, and iIn front of the church and along the south and east boundary are grass, shrubs and trees. The areas north and east of the church are more overgrown. Charles Booth, famous for his Survey into Life and Labour in London dating from 1886-1903, notes his visit to the congregational church on 28 November 1897 (Notebook B386 p14-19).

Sources consulted:

Andrew Saint (introduction), 'London Suburbs', Merrell Holberton Publishers 1999

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