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Cadogan Place Gardens * Kensington & Chelsea
   

Cadogan Place Gardens *

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* on The National Heritage List for England, Parks & Gardens

Cadogan Place Gardens is a long rectangular site with Pont Street dividing a smaller north section from the main area to the south. The North Garden, formerly called Cadogan Square, was landscaped by Humphry Repton but his work was lost with the installation of the underground car park in 1978. The South Garden used to be the London Botanic Garden and has 300-year old mulberries; in the centre is the Hans Sloane Garden, created for the 2005 Chelsea Flower Show. Both areas are railed with boundary shrubberies enclosing lawns, with clumps of shrubbery and mature trees including London plane and ailanthus. There has been extensive enrichment of trees and shrubs since the late 1970s.
Previous / Other name: Cadogan Place North and Cadogan Place South
Site location: Cadogan Place, Sloane Street
Postcode: SW1X 9PQ > Google Map
Type of site: Garden Square
Date(s): early C19th; later C19th post 1874; 1970s on
Designer(s): Humphry Repton (c.1806)
Listed structures: LBII: Nos 21-69; 70-90 Cadogan Place; 2 bollards outside 70 Cadogan Place
Borough: Kensington & Chelsea
Site ownership: The Cadogan Estate
Site management: The Cadogan Estate
Open to public? Occasionally
Opening times: Has opened for OGSW. Otherwise private, for keyholders only
Has taken part in Open Garden Squares Weekend 3 times, most recently in 2017.
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Sloane Square (District/Circle), Knightsbridge (Piccadilly). Bus: C1, 19, 22, 137, 452.
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/02/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.cadogan.co.uk

Fuller information:

Site on The National Heritage List for England, Parks & Gardens, for Register Entry see https://www.historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list

This area was once within the Manor of Chelsea, whose owners included Westminster Abbey and Henry VIII, which was purchased by Hans Sloane in 1712. When Sloane died his estate was divided between his daughters, one of whom, Elizabeth, was married to Charles Cadogan, taking the eastern part, which became the Cadogans' London estate. Cadogan Place was developed along with Sloane Street and Sloane Square on land leased from Lord Cadogan by Henry Holland for his Hans Town development from 1777 onwards. On the east side are terraced houses of the early C19th.

The gardens were not laid out until the early C19th. The North Garden, which used to be called Cadogan Square, was landscaped by Humphry Repton, who was called in by the first Lord Cadogan. Repton completed his work by 1806: 'gently winding paths given variety by excavation of the soil to form small valleys and ridges in the unrealised hope that the gardens might have the overflow of the Serpentine as a stream or lake' (EH Register). Repton's undulating contour plan has been eroded by later alteration; further development of the gardens took place post 1874 and again from 1978 after the underground car park was made underneath this northern section, although this enabled comparable mounding and 'valley' effects to be recreated.

The South Garden used to be the London Botanic Garden, and the 300-year-old mulberry trees on the south lawn are thought to have been grown for the silk trade; an interesting mixed border is now planted opposite the mulberries. Cadogan Place Gardens is a long rectangular site bounded by Sloane Street to the west; Pont Street divides the smaller northern section from the main area to the south. Both areas are railed with boundary shrubberies enclosing lawns, with clumps of shrubbery and mature trees including London plane and ailanthus.

There has been extensive enrichment of trees and shrubs since the late 1970s, the gardens now have catalpa, ginkgo, redwood, maples, various flowering cherries, hydrangea, laburnum, vibernum. On the east side of the South Garden, a walk running the length of the garden is being developed for spring interest, along with a fern garden. Near the tennis courts, a water garden is partially hidden by black bamboo and willows, while the centre south garden displays the Hans Sloane Garden, created for the 2005 Chelsea Flower Show. A bronze sculpture by David Wynne of c.1980 has been erected in the North Garden. Dickens describes Cadogan Place in 'Nicholas Nickleby' as the connecting link between the aristocratic pavements of Belgrave Square and the barbarism of Chelsea. Dorothy Jordan (1762-1816), actress, lived at Nno. 30, and William Wilberforce (1759-1833), opponent of slavery, lived at No. 44.

Sources consulted:

EH Register: Country Life, 13 November 1986, pp1492-94 (describing planting); G Carter, P Goode, K Laurie, 'Humphry Repton', 1982, pp156-7; E Cecil, 'London Parks and Gardens', 1907, p239-240; J Harpur 'The Gardener's Garden', 1985; E Hyams, 'Capability Brown and Humphry Repton', 1971, p183. Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England London 3: North West' (Penguin, 1999 ed); RBKC Hans Town Conservation Area Proposals Statement, 2000
Grid ref: TQ279791
Size in hectares: 3.5
   
On EH National Register : Yes
EH grade: Grade II
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
Yes
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Hans Town
Tree Preservation Order: Not known
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation:
   

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