London Gardens Online
Record
London Gardens Online

SITE DETAILS

Cadogan Square Gardens Kensington & Chelsea

Summary

Cadogan Square is a fine example of Queen Anne revival architecture of the 1870s and 1880s favouring red brick rather than stucco, which was carried out by the Cadogan Estate and Hans Place Estate. The private communal garden has fine mature trees, areas of lawn, ornamental planting, roses, gravel paths, a rustic shelter and tennis courts. A circular planted feature has a figurative statue in its centre by David Wynne, 'Dancer with Bird', 1975 and a collection of David Austen roses. The garden suffered in the storms of 1987, losing many plane trees, and was subsequently replanted with ornamental trees. Former residents included poet John Betjeman and novelist Arnold Bennett.

Basic Details

Site location:
Cadogan Square/Milner Street

Postcode:
SW1X 0EE ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Garden Square

Date(s):
1870s/80s

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
LBII*: Nos 4, 52, 68, 72 Cadogan Square. LBII: Nos 1, 3-57 (odd), 6-16 (even) 22-48 (even), 50, 54-58 (even), 60, 61, 62B, 63-79 (odd), 64, 66, 70, 74, 84 Cadogan Square.

Borough:
Kensington & Chelsea

Site ownership:
The Cadogan Estate

Site management:
The Cadogan Estate

Open to public?
Occasionally

Opening times:
Has opened for OGSW. Otherwise private, for keyholders only
Has taken part in Open Garden Squares Weekend 14 times, most recently in 2014.

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Tube: Knightsbridge (Piccadilly), Sloane Square (District/Circle). Bus: C1, 19, 22, 137, 452

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/06/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.cadogan.co.uk

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ277789

Size in hectares:
0.7911 ?check

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
Yes

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Hans Town

Tree Preservation Order:
Not known

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
None

Cadogan Square Gardens

Photo: Colin Wing

Click photo to enlarge.

Fuller information

This area was once within the Manor of Chelsea, whose owners included Westminster Abbey and Henry VIII. The manaor was purchased by Hans Sloane in 1712, and on his death his estate was divided between his daughters, one of whom, Elizabeth, was married to Charles Cadogan, taking the eastern part, which became the Cadogans' London estate. Cadogan Square was one of the first major C19th developments, and is a fine example of Queen Anne revival architecture of the 1870s and 1880s favouring red brick rather than stucco, which was carried out by the Cadogan Estate and Hans Place Estate. The development of Cadogan Square has been described as 'a rarity, as seldom has such a diversity of architects contributed to a single speculative housing scheme in London (including R. Norman Shaw, J J Stevenson, George Devey, A J Adams, G T Robinson, Ernest George and H A Peto)' (Hans Town Conservation Area Proposals Statement).

The east side was designed by a single architect, G T Robinson, and has a homogenous character while the west side shows great variety of fa├žade individuality due to having been developed incrementally by a variety of different architects. The south side was designed by J J Stevenson; Arnold Bennett (1867-1931), novelist, lived at no. 75. In the south-west corner are three houses by Norman Shaw (1831-1913).

The garden has fine mature trees, areas of lawn, ornamental planting, roses, gravel paths, a rustic shelter and tennis courts. A circular planted feature has a figurative statue in its centre by David Wynne, 'Dancer with Bird', 1975 and a collection of David Austen roses. The garden suffered in the storms of 1987, losing many plane trees, and was subsequently replanted with ornamental trees. The southern garden enclosure is protected under the 1863 Garden Square Act. John Betjeman referred to the square in a poem praying for protection from WWII bombing: 'Lord, put beneath Thy special care, One-eighty-nine Cadogan Square'.

Sources consulted:

RBKC Hans Town Conservation Area Proposals Statement, 2000

Page Top

Discover. Visit. Research. Explore.