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Inverness Gardens Kensington & Chelsea

Summary

This was once part of the glebe lands that had belonged to the vicars of Kensington from at least 1260. In 1853 Thomas Robinson, who owned Sheffield House and leased land in the Glebe, negotiated a new lease with the church to develop both areas of land for housing. The terrace of Inverness Gardens is unusual in having its own private roadway behind a small communal garden. Ownership of the garden remained with the Vicar of St Mary Abbots and successors.

Basic Details

Site location:
1-8 Inverness Gardens/Vicarage Gate

Postcode:
W8 ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Private Garden

Date(s):
1850s/60s

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Kensington & Chelsea

Site ownership:
private

Site management:

Open to public?
No

Opening times:
private, but visible from roadway

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Tube: High Street Kensington (District, Circle), Notting Hill Gate (Central)

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/10/2007
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news.

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ255800

Size in hectares:
0.0309

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
Yes

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Kensington Palace

Tree Preservation Order:
Not known

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
Article 4 Direction

Fuller information

Inverness Gardens was built on Glebe lands belonging to the vicars of Kensington from at least 1260, some 13 acres between Palace Gardens Terrace, Strathmore Gardens and Vicarage Gate. In 1853, Thomas Robinson, who owned Sheffield House and also leased land in the Glebe, negotiated a new lease with the vicar of St Mary Abbots, Archdeacon Sinclair, in order to develop both areas of land. The agreement reached in April 1854 gave him a 99-year lease to build, but house elevations were to be approved by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners' architect, although this does not appear to have taken place until a more formal agreement was set up in 1860. The agreement had reserved a space for a permanent church in Vicarage Gate to replace the temporary church of St Paul's that had been erected in the vicarage gardens, but this did not in the end materialise. The overall layout was likely to have been by architect David Brandon, but a number of architects were responsible for the various properties.

Inverness Gardens was designed by William Lloyd Edwards, who used classical ornamentation to the door cases, and the terrace is unusual in having its own private roadway within stuccoed walls behind a small communal garden. In 1928, the owner of this strip of garden was the Vicar of St Mary Abbots and successors, and the lessees of Nos. 1-8 Inverness Gardens (leases expiring in 1953) were entitled to use it, sharing the cost of maintenance. The Report of the Royal Commission on London Squares states that 'in the event of the lessees omitting to have the necessary work done, the Vicar may, as he thinks fit, cause it to be done and recover one-eighth part of the cost from each lessee.' At that time it is described as 'a narrow enclosure forming, with the private roadway, a common frontage to a number of dwelling-houses.'

Sources consulted:

Report of the Royal Commission on London Squares, 1928. RBKC Queen's Gate Conservation Area Proposals Statement

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