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Lowndes Square Kensington & Chelsea

Summary

This private communal garden was provided for residents of Lowndes Square, which was developed from 1836 as part of the Cadogan Estate by Thomas Cubitt and Seth Smith. It was once part of the estate of William Lowndes of Chesham, after whom it is named. The garden has original gate piers but the railings date from the C20th. Within are fine mature plane trees, a peripheral path, shrubs around the edge and a central planting feature.

Basic Details

Site location:
Lowndes Square

Postcode:
SW1 ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Garden Square

Date(s):
1836-49

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Kensington & Chelsea

Site ownership:
Cadogan Estate?

Site management:

Open to public?
No

Opening times:
private, for keyholders only

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Tube: Knightsbridge (Piccadilly). Bus: C1, 19, 22, 137.

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/10/2007
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news.

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ279795

Size in hectares:
0.4009

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
Yes

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Hans Town

Tree Preservation Order:
Not known

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
None

Lowndes Square

Click photo to enlarge.

Fuller information

This is part of the Cadogan Estate developed by Thomas Cubitt and Seth Smith from the 1830s. Having leased land from Lord Grosvenor they drained an area of marshland on the banks of the Westbourne river called the Five Fields, and began to lay out Belgravia. The land of Lowndes Square was once part of the estate of William Lowndes of Chesham, after whom it is named, and had previously been two fields either side of the river. Building of Lowndes Square began in 1836 with the east and north sides built between 1838-49, the west side was begun in 1844; the south side was part of a development by Lewis Cubitt, Thomas's younger brother. The former uniformity of the architecture of the square has disappeared with redevelopment on the north and east sides in the form of mansion blocks. In 1928 described as 'a long narrow enclosure laid out as an ornamental garden with shrubberies and some well-grown trees. Overlooked by dwelling-houses'. They are now surrounded by C20th cast metal railings that are square in section (c.1930).

Sources consulted:

Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England London 3: North West' (Penguin, 1999 ed). RBKC Hans Town Conservation Area Proposals Statement, 2000; Report of the Royal Commission on London Squares, 1928

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