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Rose Square (The Bromptons) Kensington & Chelsea
   
Summary: Rose Square is a new residential development on the site of the old Royal Brompton Hospital, and is named after Sir Philip Rose, founder of Brompton Hospital. After the North Block closed the site was redeveloped by Northacre plc, with restoration of a number of historic structures including St Luke's Chapel. Now called The Bromptons, the development is well-landscaped with gardens and courtyards. Some of the former planting remains, such as a number of fine London plane trees.
Previous / Other name: Royal Brompton Hospital North Block; The Consumption Hospital, Brompton
Site location: Fulham Road/Foulis Terrace/Sumner Place
Postcode: SW3 6RS > Google Map
Type of site: Housing/Estate Landscaping
Date(s): 1844-52; 1997-2000
Designer(s):
Listed structures: LBII*: St Luke's Chapel. LBII: Brompton Hospital (North Block)
Borough: Kensington & Chelsea
Site ownership: The Bromptons
Site management:
Open to public? No
Opening times: private
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: South Kensington (District, Circle, Piccadilly). Bus: 14
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/04/2012
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.thebromptons.org.uk

Fuller information:

Royal Brompton Hospital was the first hospital dedicated to treatment for consumption and diseases of the chest. It was founded in 1841 at the instigation of a young solicitor, Philip Rose (1816-1883) who formed a committee to establish the hospital. Rose, who was later knighted, lived in No.41 Roland Gardens. The hospital began life at the Manor House in Chelsea but the site was too small and the Governors obtained a 99-year lease from the Trustees of The Henry Smith Charity on a 3 acre site on Fulham Road for the new hospital. Following a competition won by architect Frederick Francis, the earliest part of the hospital to be built in 1844-6 was the main and western part, later the North Block. The foundation stone was laid in 1844 by Prince Albert, followed by a fund-raising event at Royal Hospital, Chelsea (q.v.), sponsored by Queen Victoria, who was a Patron of the new hospital. Resembling 'a large Tudor Almshouse', the hospital was a generally symmetrical H-shaped arrangement with a central battlemented tower, its chimneys replicating those found at Hampton Court Palace (q.v.). Sir Henry Foulis, a Yorkshire landowner, donated the hospital's Chapel of St Luke, which designed by Edward Buckton Lamb and built in 1849-50. Foulis was Chairman of the Hospital Management Committee from 1849-75. A West Wing to match the original building was added in 1852. The original entrance to the hospital was at the west side and had a gatehouse lodge, now demolished.

In 1853 the Governors purchased the freehold of the 4-acre plot to the west of the hospital from the Harrington-Villars estate and granted building leases to Charles Delay who built Foulis Terrace, Neville Street, Neville Gardens, 9-17 Onslow Gardens and 80-108 Fulham Road. The freehold of the hospital site was purchased from Smith's Charity in 1866 and the hospital estate remained a single unit until recent years. In 1871 the hospital received a significant bequest from Cordelia Angelica Read, as a result of which the hospital buildings south of Fulham Road were built in 1879-92.

After the hospital vacated the site north of Fulham Road, it was sold and redeveloped by Northacre plc, the company responsible for Earls Terrace (q.v.). New blocks to the east and west of the main building were built in the style of the original and St Luke's Chapel was restored. Landscaping surrounds the buildings, with garden areas around the blocks and in inner courtyards, some named to reflect the former history of the site, such as Foulis Terrace Gardens.

Sources consulted:

Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England London 3: North West' (Penguin, 1999 ed); RBKC Thurloe Estate & Smith's Charity Conservation Area Proposals Statement; history on The Bromptons website (www.thebromptons.org.uk)
Grid ref: TQ268784
Size in hectares:
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Thurloe Estate & Smith's Charity
Tree Preservation Order: Yes
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation:
   

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