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Richmond Green and Little Green Richmond
   
Summary: Richmond Green has been an important open space since medieval times when jousting tournaments and pageants took place, although as commonland it was used for grazing sheep. From the C14th the Lord of the Manor was the King and the Green was overlooked by Richmond Palace, then called Sheen Palace, occupied by monarchs until the late C17th. The royal connection led to the early growth of Richmond, which continued to develop as a fashionable town, and a popular place for excursions in the C19th. In 1899 Richmond Theatre was built on Little Green, an extension of the main green to the east. Criss-crossed by paths, the Green is bordered by fine mature trees and is surrounded by historic buildings.
Previous / Other name:
Site location: The Green, Richmond
Postcode: TW9 1LX > Google Map
Type of site: Public Open Land
Date(s): medieval onwards
Designer(s):
Listed structures: LBI: Former Gateway to Palace, Old Palace & Gate House, gates & railings to Maids of Honour Row 1-4. LBII*: Oak House, gates and railings, Old Court House, Old Friars gates & railings, Old Palace Place, Nos. 2-6, 10, railings to 11, 12, 32 Richmond Green. LBII: Lamp standard outside No 1, Pair K6 telephone kiosks, Drinking Fountain, Wentworth House, wall & piers, Nos 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 & 9, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21 & 22, 23 & 24, 25, 29, 30, 31, 44 Richmond Green; Pembroke Villas 1-20, Portland Terrace 1-4
Borough: Richmond
Site ownership: Crown Estate Commissioners
Site management: LB Richmond, Environment Planning & Review, Parks and Open Spaces. Friends of Richmond Green
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities: Cricket pitches (leased to clubs)
Events: Cricket matches. Various events include annual May Fair and Victorian Evening at Christmas
Public transport: Rail/London Overground/Tube (District): Richmond. Bus: 190, 33, 337, 371, 371, 391, 419, 485, 490, 65, H22, H37, R68, R70
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/07/2005
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.richmond.gov.uk/parks_and_open_spaces

Fuller information:

'One of the most beautiful urban greens surviving anywhere in England' (Pevsner), Richmond Green has been an important open space since medieval times when jousting tournaments and pageants took place here, although it was commonland which was used by villagers for grazing sheep. From the C14th the Lord of the Manor was the King and the Green was overlooked by Richmond Palace, then called Sheen or Shene Palace, occupied by monarchs until the late C17th. The Green is just outside the old palace gateway and linked the palace with the Old Deer Park (q.v.). A survey of 1649 described the Green as 20 acres of 'excellent land . . . Well turfed, level, and a splendid ornament to the palace. One hundred and thirteen elm trees, forty-eight whereof stand all together on the west side, and include in them a very handsome walk'. On the south-east side of the Green are late C17th and early C18th terraces of smart townhouses and Richmond continued to develop as a fashionable town, and in the C19th was a popular place for excursions. In 1861 Charles Dickens describes the Green in 'Great Expectations' where 'Some ancient trees before the house were still cut into fashions as formal and unnatural as the hoops and wigs and stiff skirts'.

In 1879-81 the Public Library was built on the Green and in 1899 Richmond Theatre, designed by Frank Matcham, was built on Little Green, an extension of the Green to the east, which has been so-called since at least the C18th. This was not the first theatre on the Green, a Theatre Royal modelled on Drury Lane having been built in the north-west corner in the 1760s which was not pulled down until 1884. In its heyday Edmund Kean, Charles Macready and Mrs Siddons had performed here and Kean is buried in the churchyard of St Mary Magdalene, Richmond (q.v.).

Today the Green is a rectangular grassed space, criss-crossed by paths, with clusters of mature trees around the periphery. The fine Portland stone late C19th drinking fountain in the south west corner of Richmond Green was restored by private subscription in commemoration of Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee in 1977. Surrounding the Green are excellent houses including Maids of Honour Row, 1724, the entrance to Richmond Palace and Old Palace Yard and substantial C19th houses. In 2001 Kim Wilkie Associates drew up a long-term landscape assessment and strategy to ensure its future management conserves the historic green.

Sources consulted:

Bridget Cherry & Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: London 2: South (Penguin) 1999; Country Life 12/5/1944; Ben Weinreb & Christopher Hibbert, 'The London Encyclopaedia' (Macmillan, revised ed. 1993); The Parks Agency 'Commons, Heaths and Greens in Greater London. A short report for English Heritage', 2005
Grid ref: TQ179750
Size in hectares: 4.8
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
Yes: Green (TVG25)
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Richmond Green
Tree Preservation Order: To be checked
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: Yes
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation:
   

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