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St Dunstan's Churchyard Sutton

Summary

A church in Cheam was recorded in the Domesday Book and probably dates from the early C11th, dedicated to St Dunstan. The old church was demolished in the 1860s and a new church built next to the Lumley Chapel, which was the chancel of the medieval church that had been converted as a memorial chapel for the Lumley family in the late C16th. St Dunstan's Church and Lumley Chapel stand in a well tended churchyard with mature cedars and yews. There are a number of historic tombs and a war memorial with an Arts and Crafts lych-gate of 1891 at the entrance.

Basic Details

Previous / Other name:
Cheam Parish Church

Site location:
Malden Road, Cheam

Postcode:
SM3 8QH ( Google Map)

Type of site:
Churchyard

Date(s):
Medieval; C19th

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
LBII*: St Dunstan's Church; Lumley Chapel. LBII: Lych-gate; tombs: Christian & Henry Neale( d.1687), Fleetwood Dormer (d.1736), Daniel Sanxay (d.1739), William Farmer (c1815)

Borough:
Sutton

Site ownership:
Church of England

Site management:
Church of England

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
unrestricted

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Rail Cheam. Bus: 151, 213, 726.

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/11/2004
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news.

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ242638

Size in hectares:

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Cheam Village

Tree Preservation Order:
No

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:
No

Other LA designation:
None

Fuller information

The Archbishop of Canterbury acquired Cheam in 1018 and the church is likely to date from soon after this. It is dedicated to St Dunstan who was Archbishop of Canterbury from 959 - 988AD, later displaced by St Thomas à Becket. The current church was built by T H Pownall in 1864 in French Gothic style, and it stands next to the Lumley Chapel, which was the chancel remaining from the medieval parish church. John, Lord Lumley had converted it into a memorial chapel for himself and his 2 wives in the 1590s. He had inherited Nonsuch Palace in 1580 through his first wife Jane, who was daughter and co-heiress of the Earl of Arundel. Lumley developed the gardens at Nonsuch and he was an important connoisseur and collector of books and paintings.

Sources consulted:

Bridget Cherry & Nikolaus Pevsner, London 2: South, 1983; LB Sutton Heritage website

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