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Kent Terrace Westminster
   
Summary: Kent Terrace was built as part of Regent's Park Crown Estate development, a unified terrace designed by John Nash. It was built by William Smith, one of the number of speculative builders working within Nash's overall design, one of the last terraces to be built. Nash recommended Smith's scheme to the Commissioners in 1827 on condition that Smith would 'lay out the ground in front in an ornamental manner'.
Previous / Other name:
Site location: Kent Terrace/Park Road
Postcode: NW8 7RH > Google Map
Type of site: Private Garden
Date(s): 1827
Designer(s): John Nash
Listed structures: LBII*: Nos.1-18 Kent Terrace. LBII: 9 lamp standards to forecourt drive of Kent Terrace
Borough: Westminster
Site ownership: Crown Estate Paving Commission
Site management: Crown Estate Paving Commission
Open to public? No
Opening times: private
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Baker Street (Bakerloo, Jubilee, Hammersmith & City, Circle, Metropolitan), Marylebone (Bakerloo). Bus: 13, 82, 113, 274
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/03/2003
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.cepc.org.uk

Fuller information:

Kent Terrace is part of John Nash's Regent's Park Crown Estate development, and was one of the last terraces to be built. It is the only major terrace that faces away from the park, with forecourt gardens facing Park Road, and backing onto the mews of Hanover Terrace (q.v.). Kent Terrace was built by William Smith, one of the number of speculative builders working within Nash's overall design. Having been a Crown Estate since 1539, the area of Regent's Park was by the end of the C18th largely farmland. Schemes to develop the area as a public park (first names Marylebone Park) were considered from c.1809, and from 1812 until c.1830 John Nash's plan of 1811 (with modifications) was implemented, the public area being opened 1835 as The Regent's Park (q.v.). The site of Regent's Park is roughly circular, being bounded by Prince Albert Road from west to north-north-east, Albany Street to east, Park Square and Park Crescent (q.v.) to south-east, various terraces to south, and by Park Road to south-west. Nash recommended Smith's scheme for Kent Terrace to the commissioners in 1827 on condition that Smith would "lay out the ground in front in an ornamental manner". Peter Potter's survey of Marylebone of c1832 shows lawn with rectangular wilderness as central feature. Elegant railings, 2 notable Horse Chestnuts, shrubs.

Sources consulted:

See Regent's Park bibliography. Ann Saunders, 'Regent's Park. From 1086 to the Present' (Bedford College, 1969/1981); John Summerson, 'John Nash: Architect to King George IV' (1935); James Elmes 'Metropolitan Improvements or London in the Nineteenth Century, 1828', (The London Encyclopaedia, 1827); Terrence Davis, 'John Nash: The Prince Regent's Architect' (1966/73)
Grid ref: TQ275825
Size in hectares: 0.158
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
Yes
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Regent's Park
Tree Preservation Order: To be checked
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area:
Other LA designation:
   

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