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Savoy Churchyard Westminster
   
Summary: Savoy Churchyard contains the former Chapel Royal that was built in 1510-16 as part of the Hospital of St John and restored after a fire in 1864/5. The Hospital was built near the site of the Savoy Palace built by Peter, future Count of Savoy on land granted by Henry III in 1245. The palace, later owned by John of Gaunt, was sacked during the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, remaining derelict until 1505 when it was demolished. The churchyard is now laid out as a garden with an oval lawn surrounded by a stone plinth, shrubs and some fine trees, with gravestones on the perimeter.
Sheep in the Savoy churchyard about 1825, reproduced from Mrs Basil Holmes, 'The London Burial Grounds', 1896
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Previous / Other name: Churchyard of The Queen's Chapel of Savoy; Chapel Royal; Chapel of the Royal Victoria Order
Site location: Savoy Hill, Savoy Street, off The Strand
Postcode: WC2R 0DA > Google Map
Type of site: Churchyard
Date(s): 1510-16; 1860s
Designer(s): Sydney Smirke
Listed structures: LBII*: Chapel. LBII: cast-iron railings and gates.
Borough: Westminster
Site ownership: Duchy of Lancaster
Site management: Duchy of Lancaster
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: 11am-3pm Tuesday-Friday. Chapel open 11.30am-3.30pm Tues-Fri + services 11am Sunday and 12.30pm Wednesday
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Temple (District, Circle)
Sheep in the Savoy churchyard about 1825, reproduced from Mrs Basil Holmes, 'The London Burial Grounds', 1896
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The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/07/2009
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.duchyoflancaster.co.uk/duties-of-the-duchy/the-queens-chapel-of-the-savoy

Fuller information:

This atmospheric churchyard off the steeply sloping Savoy Street contains the former Chapel Royal (now the Queen's Chapel of the Savoy) built in 1510-16 as part of the Hospital of St John by Henry VII and restored after a fire by Sydney Smirke in 1864/5. Nearby was the site of the Savoy Palace that preceded the Hospital of St John, built by Peter, future Count of Savoy on land granted to him by Henry III in 1245. The palace was acquired by Edmond of Lancaster, Edward I's brother in 1284 and was later owned by John of Gaunt when it was sacked during the Peasants' Revolt in 1381. After this it remained derelict until 1505, then demolished to make way for the new hospital. The Chapel remains in the ownership of the Queen in Her Right as Duke of Lancaster. Both the Chapel and its churchyard are the responsibility of the Duchy of Lancaster, which holds the freehold of 1 hectare of land between The Strand and the Embankment, part of the Manor of Savoy. The former churchyard, which is high above the level of the street, has been laid out as a garden, retaining a number of gravestones that attest to its former use. The cast-iron railings and gates were erected as part of Sidney Smirke's restoration programme of c.1864. In 2003 the churchyard gardens were re-landscaped in honour of the Queen's Golden Jubilee and have an oval lawn within a surrounding stone plinth, planted with shrubs and having some fine trees; a number of gravestones are on the perimeter.

Sources consulted:

Simon Bradley and Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England London 6: Westminster', (Yale University Press, 2003), pp297/8
Grid ref: TQ305807
Size in hectares:
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade:
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Savoy
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation:
   

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